Charles Neidich – Cavallini and Jeanjean Editions

With the release of new editions by acclaimed clarinetist Charles Neidich this season, we also wanted to acquaint our readers to two outstanding previously issued publications that make significant contributions to the clarinet literature~

Cavallini coverErnesto Cavallini: 30 Caprices for Clarinet
With 2 Full Performance CD’s
Edited and Recorded by Charles Neidich

Excerpts from the Editor’s notes:

Called the Paganini of the Clarinet by the English clarinet virtuoso, Henry Lazarus, Ernesto Cavallini was a respected friend and colleague of the most important Italian composers of his day, including Rossini, Donizetti, and Verdi. Cavallini wrote his 30 Caprices in five volumes, each including pieces for both technical and musical study. He was intensely interested that the Caprices be not merely technical exercises, but studies in style and phrasing: an introduction to the new expressive force of the new music of his time. With this in mind, he made numerous expressive indications in his etudes which went beyond the standard markings of crescendo, diminuendo, accelerando, ritardando. I have restored these markings and have included translations at the end of the volume. The noteworthy feature of this edition is the recording I have included with my performances of the Caprices. Rather than clutter Cavallini’s already expressively notated scores with still more markings, I offer the recording as a window into the “bel canto” style of the etudes and as models of the kind of performance to which the student should aspire. Order from your favorite retailer or through Hal Leonard.

Jeanjean coverPaul Jeanjean: 18 Etudes for Clarinet (Etudes de perfectionnement)
With 2 Full Performance CD’s
Edited and Recorded by Charles Neidich

Excerpts from the Editor’s notes:

Since I first played them as a student, I have had a special love for Jeanjean’s 18 Etudes de peifectionnement. Paul Jeanjean, who was principal clarinetist of the Garde Republicaine Band and later of the Monte Carlo opera, was, obviously, a musician of the greatest sensitivity. His etudes are highly developed concert works that can make for very impressive additions to recital programs. Jeanjean did not want players of his etudes to simply be concerned with learning the notes. He hoped his etudes would help educate clarinetists to hear and appreciate the new music of his time. The noteworthy feature of this edition is the recording I have included with my performances of the etudes. Rather than clutter Jeanjean’s already expressively notated scores with still more markings, I offer the recording as a window into the modern, yet romantic style of the etudes and as models of the kind of performance to which the student should aspire. Order from your favorite retailer or through Hal Leonard.